What To Do With Crystallized Honey

First of all let me make it very clear that crystallization of honey is natural and except for those rare honeys that do not crystallize (like acacia) honey not crystallizing, or taking a very long time to crystallize is actually an indication that your honey may not be 100% honey or it filtered to such a high degree that much of the good stuff that we want in natural honey is gone.

For most things I actually prefer crystallized honey.  Keeping it in a wide mouth mason jar means I can just spoon out what I want and it doesn’t run all over the place.  In fact I add crystallized honey to the stuff that hasn’t crystallized yet to seed the crystals into growing sooner.  My favorite is something called spun or creamed honey.  The crystals are very small and produces something that is smooth and spreadable like butter.

However if you want your honey liquid all you have to do is warm it up.  Keep in mind if you get it too warm you destroy some of the components that make local raw honey so good for you.  If you keep your honey in glass jars it is easier to warm it up if you feel it is needed.  Just heat up some water (or if your tap water is hot enough just use that) and put the jar in that.

How I seed honey crystals

Stir up crystals
Stir up crystals
Add more honey and stir again
Add more honey and stir again
Wait
Wait

Author: Jerry Ward

Working on creating a 10 acre urban homestead in S.E. Michigan. To pay the bills I work as a product manager/business analyst in the IT field. Now the admin of Save Our Skills

  • Yes the key is gentle heat, only heat it up barely enough to liquefy again. Also slow is better as you reduce the risk of getting too hot.

  • Jack Fecalman

    Jerry, I have a 5 gal. can of honey that is quite old. So far as I know it has never been opened since the can was filled. I want to re-pack it in qt. and pt. Mason jars. How hot is too hot? How hot does it need to be for the jars to seal?

  • First of all you don’t need to seal the Mason jars that you put Honey in. Honey will never “go bad”, it will just crystallize. This time of year you can put the your bucket of honey in a car in parked in the sun with the windows up. I will probably warm up enough to liquefy. If the top of the bucket/can comes off you can scoop out the crystallized honey with something like an ice cream scoop. The put the Mason jar in a hot water bath and it will liquefy. Also if you are using it to sweeten a hot beverage, just spoon some of it out and put it in your cup. The only thing I use liquid honey if for spreading on something like biscuits, I just find it easier to spoon out honey when it is crystallized.

  • First of all you don’t need to seal the Mason jars that you put Honey in. Honey will never “go bad”, it will just crystallize. This time of year you can put the your bucket of honey in a car in parked in the sun with the windows up. I will probably warm up enough to liquefy. If the top of the bucket/can comes off you can scoop out the crystallized honey with something like an ice cream scoop. Then put the Mason jar in a hot water bath and it will liquefy. Another option is to put the honey in a cooler and put a light bulb in with it to gently warm it up.

    Also if you are using it to sweeten a hot beverage, just spoon some of it out and put it in your cup. The only thing I use liquid honey if for spreading on something like biscuits, I just find it easier to spoon out honey when it is crystallized.